India 

India 

(Source: indiaincredible)

thisissuchabore:

i-cant-believe-its-no-homo:

a-night-in-wonderland:

Artist Henrique Oliveira Constructs a Cavernous Network of Repurposed Wood Tunnels at MAC USP

Outstanding

Holy shit

(via munem)

(Source: theguccislut, via munem)

cabbagerose:

false bay writer’s cabin/olson kundig architects

via: architypereview

(via really-shit)

asylum-art:

Motoi Yamamotos Incredible Saltscapes

Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto sees more uses in salt than the ordinary person. His artwork stems from the death of his sister, who passed away at a young age from brain cancer. In Japanese culture there is an idea of throwing salt over yourself after you attend a funeral acts as a sort of cleansing. So Yamamoto started using salt as his medium, creating intricate labyrinths and mazes as he calls them. Not only does Motoi create intricate patterns but full scale installations as well.

There’s also a beautiful book by Motoi that showcases some of his art called Return to the Sea: Saltscapes by Motoi Yamamoto.

Watch the video:

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

Lynn Nguyen

Lynn Nguyenis an artist and illustrator living in Sydney Australia. She attended The National Art School and graduated witha BFA in Visual art, focusing on drawing & photography.

dreamshots:

Dreamcatcher

dreamshots:

Dreamcatcher

(Source: valonz.com.au, via nobleu)

asylum-art:

Nicolas Bruno Photography Sleep Paralysis

(Source: f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s, via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

NeSpoon Polska: Lace Street Art
  on Behance
Warsaw-based artist NeSpoon uses ornate lace patterns in her unique brand of street art that translates into ceramics, stencils, paintings, and crocheted webbing installed in public spaces. NeSpoon refers to her art as “public jewelry,” specifically as an act of beautification by turning abandoned and unadorned spaces into something aesthetically pleasing. You can see much more over Warsaw-based artist NeSpoon uses ornate lace patterns in her unique brand of street art that translates into ceramics, stencils, paintings, and crocheted webbing installed in public spaces. NeSpoon refers to her art as “public jewelry,” specifically as an act of beautification by turning abandoned and unadorned spaces into something aesthetically pleasing.

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

Animals Painted On Delicate Feather Canvases by Jamie Homeister

on Facebook

Jamie Homeister, a folk artist from New Albany, Indiana, paints exquisite portraits of animals and birds on the most unusual canvas – feathers. Her magnificent featherwork is influenced by her Canadian heritage, but she also depicts themes from Native American culture.

Jamie receives the feather that she works on from the people who commission her to paint images of their birds – the same ones that actually shed the feathers. “I do much of it by commission – many of my parrot-feather paintings depict the parrots from whom the feathers themselves fell,” the artist explains.

“I’ve always been intrigued by the lifestyles of all those who walked this Earth before us, so feather painting just always made sense to me,” Jamie said. “Featherwork is incredibly humbling media. The feathers splice, buckle, splinter and shed under the weight of paint.”

(via asylum-art)

american-hustler:

Shot by Alexei Bazdarev

american-hustler:

Shot by Alexei Bazdarev

(via american-hustler)

asylum-art:

The Ancient Art of Stone:Couple Creates Beautiful Rock Wall Art Installations

 Ancient Art of Stone | Facebook

Andreas Kunert and Naomi Zettl, a married artist duo based in Vancouver, create beautiful flowing wall installations out of rocks, pebbles, and other decorative elements.

I am passionate to give stone an articulated form. This involves finding the right stones – listening,” explains Kunert, who takes commissions through a website called Ancient Art Of Stone that he runs together with Zettl.

For those not planning major interior remodeling work any time soon, the couple also sells prints of smaller detailed and colorful work that they create specifically for this purpose. Due to their smaller size, these pieces can incorporate colorful stones and elements that just wouldn’t work in their larger installations. Take a look!

Via boredpanda

(via asylum-art)

(Source: ashleysky)

asylum-art:

Pejac: New Street Pieces - Paris, France

on Facebook

Pejac recently spent some time in Paris, France where he worked his way through a couple of new street pieces including the above piece which is entitled “Ants”.
With his minimalist but clear style, he painted 2 silhouettes of kids being cruel with magnifying glass on what looks like colony of ants. But, instead of burning ants which is always an interesting game to play, these kids are burning little humans. The artist used the texture of raw concrete wall, and painted these little men to look as a realistic colony of ants. Juxtaposed with flat silhouettes of children, the tiny creatures shown with their shadows and in perspective, look very fragile and harmless. The Spanish artist also painted two extra pieces including a surrealistic and amazing door.
Check out more photos of the new pieces after the jump and come back soon for more mural updates from Pejac. This piece can be seen in person @ Avenue de 8 Mai 1945, Vitry-sur-Seine, Paris.

(via asylum-art)